Imagine these hateful jews celebrating a genocide, just like Noah's Ark.

Passover is a celebration on genocide, the deaths of the Egyptian first-born.
How cool is that?

Passover is one of those events Jews celebrate because the story line says that God killed all the children in Egypt except the jewish babies. I'm surprised these idiots don't have another day of celebration for the story of Noah's Ark, where God kills all but eight people on the planet. The jewish god, Yahweh seems as irrational as the muslim god, Allah!

The jews should also celebrate their own genocide (the alleged Holocaust) on April 20. Adolf Hitler's birthday.

In the narrative of the Exodus, the Bible tells that God inflicted ten plagues upon the Egyptians before Pharaoh would release his Hebrew slaves, with the tenth plague being the killing of every firstborn male, from the Pharaoh's son to the firstborn of the dungeon captive, to the firstborn of cattle. The Hebrews were instructed to mark the doorposts of their homes with the blood of a spring lamb and, upon seeing this, the spirit of the Lord passed over these homes, hence the term "passover". When Pharaoh freed the Hebrews, it is said that they left in such a hurry that they could not wait for bread to rise. In commemoration, for the duration of Passover no leavened bread is eaten, for which reason it is called "The Festival of the Unleavened Bread". Matzo (flat unleavened bread) is the primary symbol of the holiday.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Is_there_evidence_of_Israelite_slavery_in_Egypt

Were Jews ever really slaves in Egypt, or is Passover a myth? Where is the real proof - archeological evidence, state records and primary sources?

One of the biggest events of the Jewish calendar is predicated upon reminding the next generation every year of how the Egyptians were their cruel slave-masters, in a bondage that never happened.

The reality is that there is no evidence whatsoever that the Jews were ever enslaved in Egypt. Yes, there's the story contained within the bible itself, but that's not a remotely historically admissible source. I'm talking about real proof; archeological evidence, state records and primary sources. Of these, nothing exists.

It is hard to believe that 600,000 families (which would mean about two million people) crossed the entire Sinai without leaving one shard of pottery (the archeologist's best friend) with Hebrew writing on it. It is remarkable that Egyptian records make no mention of the sudden migration of what would have been nearly a quarter of their population, nor has any evidence been found for any of the expected effects of such an exodus; such as economic downturn or labor shortages. Furthermore, there is no evidence in Israel that shows a sudden influx of people from another culture at that time. No rapid departure from traditional pottery has been seen, no record or story of a surge in population.


One would think that after wandering around the Sinai peninsula for forty years without GPS, Moses and his mob would have left something in the sand for archeologists. No pottery is found to support the possible existence of one million people wandering around.

The destination of the Exodus was the land of Canaan, the promised land. At the time of the Exodus, Egyptian power extended to the Greecian islands. The Sinai and land of Canaan was under Egyptian control at the time and there is no Egyptian documentation of any such mass migration.

The funny part of passover is that Yahweh could identify you as a jew only if you were circumcised. Yes, Yahweh was a penis inspector.


In Exodus we have an account of the manner in which Jehovah delivered the Jews from Egyptian bondage. We now know that the jews were never enslaved by the Egyptians: that the entire story is a fiction. We know this because there is not found in Hebrew a word of Egyptian origin, and there is not found in the language of the Egyptians a word of Hebrew origin. This being so, we know that the Hebrews and Egyptians could not have lived together for hundreds of years.

As the Passover myth is discredited over time, the jews are busy replacing it with the the Holocaust Religion . They just have to maintain the illusion that they are victims.

Highlights of Passover

By Rabbi Yakov Lazaros

Passover begins this year on Monday evening, March 29, at 7 p.m. and ends on Tuesday evening, April 6, at approximately 8p.m. While it is impossible in a brief article to detail all the laws of Passover, some of the main aspects can be highlighted.

  1. Bedikas Chametz:

    On Sunday night, March 28, at 8, the house is searched for any chometz (leavened food). The head of the house searches with a lit candle, wooden spoon and a feather. Any chometz found is put away to be burned the following morning. After the search is concluded, the following is recited: "All chometz and leavening that may still be in my possession which I have not seen or removed or whose existence I have no knowledge of. shall be considered ownerless as the dust of the earth."

  2. Eating of Chometz:

    No chometz may be eaten from Erev Pesach, Monday, March 29, at 10:30 a.m. until Tuesday: April 6, at 8 p.m. Chometz is defined as any one of the five types of grain: wheat, rye, spelt, barley and oats, which has come into contact with water for 18 minutes. On Passover. therefore, we may not eat bread, rolls, cakes, cookies, candies, cereals, pastas, etc., We may not drink any form of whiskey, beer, vodka, scotch, etc, since they ure all made from grain. There are certain companies that manufacture Kosher for Passover cookies and cakes made from matzah meal instead of flour. Naturally, they must state Kosher for Passover on the package and be endorsed by a reliable Rabbinic organization. The most reliable sold in the Greater Framingham area are OKP ind the OUP (they must also say Kosher for Passover on the package).

    By Rabbinic decree, we do not eat any grain vegetables on Passover. Thus, legumes, rice, beans, peas, peanuts, com, etc., are also forbidden on Passover.

    Since modern food technology is so complex, we do not use any processed or packaged food unless it is endorsed as Kosher for Passover by a reliable Rabbinic organization. All raw fruits and raw vegetables (except for trains and those prohibited by Rabbinic decree) are Kosher for Passover and require no endorsement. Grade A frozen orange juice is also kosher for Passover.

  3. Selling of Chometz:

    On Passover, not only is the eating of chometz. forbidden, but we are also forbidden to have any chometz in our possession. We are also not pemitted to use the same dishes, pots and silverware, etc., as all year round. Most people, therefore, have a separate set of dishes for Pesash. (Certain pots and silverware can be made Kosher for PassOver through the "koshening process" with boiling water. Consult your Rabbi for details). Any chometz which we have not consumed or destroyed before Monday morning, March 29, must be sold to a non-Jew. This is accomplished as follows: By Monday morming, the house has been cleaned of all chometz. Any chometz we wish to keep is then placed in a special closet or shelf or other designated area which we will not use during Passover. The closet or shelf, etc., should be kept locked throughout the entire Passover. We sign a contract with our Rabbi designating him as our agent to sell our chometz to a non-Jew

    Even though the chometz is in a locked closet or shelf in our house, it is still sold to the non-Jew and we are not transgressing the prohibition of having chometz in our possession on Passover. Our year round dishes are first thoroughly cleaned and then put away in the chometz closet before Passover.

  4. Burning of Chometz:

    On Monday. March 29, at 11:30 a.m., we burn whatever chometz crumbs and particles were found in the search the night before, The year round dishes are put away on this day and this is the last day to sell your chometz. The declaration is again recited Monday before 11:30 a.m. "All manner of leaven that is in my possession which I have seen or have not seen, which I have removed or have not removed, shall be mull and disowned as the dust of the earth."

  5. The Seder:

    On both Monday, March 29, evening and Tuesday, March 30, we conduct Seders. Simple instruction can be found in any English translated Haggadah. The seders should not begin before 8 p.m. The main points of the Seder are:

    • A. Eating Matzah.
    • B. Drinking four cups of wine.
    • C. Eating bitter herbs.
    • D. Reciting the Haggadah
    • E. Reciting psalms or praise (Hallel).

  6. After Pesach:

    As stated before, we may not eat any chometz from Monday, March 29, at 20:30 a.m. until Tuesday, April 6. at 8 p.m. On Tuesday, April 6, at 8:30 p.m., we may unlock the chometz closet and begin cating chometz. However, we may not purchase chometz from a Jewish-owned supermarket unless the owner has sold his, chometz before Passsover. People should be especially careful with bakeries, not to buy bread, rolls, cake, etc., from a Jewish baker that was opened during Passover Such products are forbidden forever. Not just during Passover.

If any reader has a question concerning the laws of Passover, or concerning which medicines are Kosher for Passover, they may contact me at 508-877-5313.

Schedule of Passover Services at Congregational Bais Chabad, 74 Joseph Road in Framingham, follow,

March 29, 7 a.m., Siyum for First Born, light candles at 6:50 p.m; March 30, 10a.m, Passover Services, light candles after 8 p.an; March 31, 10 a.m., Passover Services; April 3, 10 am, Shabbos Services; April 5, Passover Services, light candles after 8 p.m.; April 6, 10. a.m., Passover Services (Yizkor Day)

Rabbi Yakov Lazaros is the director of Congregation Bais Chabad in Framingham.

Send comments to: hjw2001@gmail.com